Author Archives: Dave Peters

Humans on the barrens: “Too dang cold” for the Hillocks

(Once the homestead of Benjamin Hillock at the corner of Dry Landing Road and St. Croix Trail.)  Humphrey Hillock may never have seen the Namekagon Barrens. Born 1836 in Michigan, he moved as a young man to Webster City, Iowa, … Continue reading

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History walk: Better than a crumbling foundation

(Plum trees left from the Samual and LuAnn Turner homestead 100 years ago?) Four of us took a history walk on the barrens today, and evidence of the past was a little different than expected. Mark Nupen, Vern Drake and … Continue reading

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Humans on the barrens: The wandering Arvid Lyons

We know for certain where Arvid Lyons lived out the end of his eventful life. And we know where he lies at rest in the Namekagon Barrens of northwestern Wisconsin. How and why he got there is a little more … Continue reading

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Humans on the barrens: Clemens family, Clemens Creek

Concrete foundations of what likely were silos for hay on the homestead of William and Mary Clemens. At least three of us – Brian Finstad, Vern Drake and I – have poked around separately in recent weeks on what seems … Continue reading

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Humans on the barrens: Jim Anderson

Vern Drake and Dave Peters visited Jim Anderson on June 5, 2018, and he shared with us several documents, photos and his memory of his grandparents and other people who lived in the area around Little Sand Lake in the … Continue reading

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Annual open house

(Photo by Jerome McAllister.) The Friends of the Namekagon Barrens Wildlife Area held their annual open house June 9, 2018, a little earlier than in past years. We gathered as always at the cabin on Gomulak Fire Lane, but this … Continue reading

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Humans on the barrens: Severne’s lilacs

The lilacs of Severne Bradley were the telltale, opening a window on a century-old community of struggling farmers in the sands of northwest Wisconsin. In a mixed forest of pine, oak and aspen a half mile south of the main … Continue reading

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